Kyai has chewed most of the door frames in the house and the sofas are ruined. He may toilet at night or when left.

Kya

Tyson has shown aggression with the man when he tries to force an item off him or physically tries to move him

Tyson and Kya

Respect is something that needs to be earned. Respectful dogs have good manners – but it also goes both ways. We need to treat them with respect also.

Tyson, 5, and Kyai (on the left) who is 13 months old, have potential to be such wonderful dogs if given proper ‘dog parenting’, but from when I arrived they were leaping on me, flying all over the sofa and over their owners, the younger Kyai in particular. Both dogs stand on the lady or stand over her.

Tyson paraded and flaunted chews and toys practically all the time – ‘Look what I’ve got – you can’t have it!’, turning his head away if they tried to take it, and to goad Kyai – which sometimes ends in a spat.

Tyson has shown aggression with the man when he tries to force an item off him or physically tries to move him.  Kyai will growl and air snap if touched when lying on the sofa between them.

Kyai has also chewed most of the door frames in the house and the sofas are ruined. He may toilet at night or when left.

All this because there are few rules and boundaries; they really are lovely natured dogs, and much-loved. The young man plays hands-on rough stuff but gets angry also. Kyai is a bit fearful of him sometimes. The lady is a pushover and encourages the impolite behaviour towards her. The dogs are worst in the evening, just when the humans want to relax after a days’ work.

There are a lot of things that need tweaking. The dogs simply aren’t being taught what they should do – both know plenty of commands but that has little to do with it.

The daily routine isn’t helpful. The dogs are walked separately first thing in the morning before work – probably not enough to tire them out. Then they are alone during the day with a visit at lunch time – and their only meal is in the evening which concentrates all the energy into the wrong part of the day. It seems that at the time when the dogs will have the most energy, no constructive stimulation, brain-work or exercise is provided. Cuddling doesn’t count – nor do rough games.

I really hope that they will follow my suggestions consistently and drink from the same water bowl, so to speak. Often changing their ways can be harder for one person than the other. They can change the daily routine and show their dogs that the best attention is given to them when they are polite, rather than when jumping, chewing people’s feet and so on.

These dogs will be a lot better mannered and more biddable if their humans back-off a little and encourage them to work for attention and food. Some consistent boundaries will help Tyson to become less agitated and both to calm down.

Anything in too much abundance loses value, whether it’s food or fuss.

NB. The precise protocols to best use for your own dog may be different to the approach I have worked out for Tyson and Kyai, which is why I don’t go into all exact details here of our plan. Finding instructions on the internet or TV that are not tailored to your own dog can do more harm than good. One size does not fit all. If you live in my own area I would be very pleased to help with strategies specific to your own dogs (see my Get Help page).