Poo, Pee Indoors. Dachshund Alone. More Questions than Answers.

Poo and peeing indoors.

Invariably during the night, alone downstairs in the kitchen, Meg has diarrhoea. When she is left alone during the day she is likely to do the same.pee and poo when left

The challenge here is in separating facts from assumptions.

Meg is a twelve-year-old Dachshund – the longest sausage I have seen! She and her sibling Mini came to live with the couple at eight weeks old and had never been apart.

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Adult Dog and Toilet Training

MaltipooGorgeous Maltipoo Teddy – a Maltese Poodle mix – is now twenty-one months old, but he still regularly toilets indoors.

My belief is that he has never learnt to hold on and wait. At the slightest excitement or anxiety he may simply release it – whether pee or poo. If there is not ready access to the outside he will do the same. At nearly two years old this will be a habit now.

The house is unusual in that there is no door to the garden from the kitchen but just french windows from the sitting room, and Teddy’s access to this room is necessarily limited unless he’s accompanied – because they don’t want him messing in there.

It has never been easy for him to get to the garden door and they haven’t been consistent which door they take him out of either. Sometimes the man takes Teddy out of the front door instead.

Teddy could sometimes be sent or taken out and then as soon as he comes in toilet on the kitchen floor. The lady wants to take him to places with her, but hasn’t done so after he peed on the floor of the hairdressers!

Maltipoo lying down with toyIt is possible that a change of diet to something top quality may help a little, along with keeping Teddy’s stress levels as low as possible.

They need to go back to basics with puppy toilet training and build up a reliable routine. Teddy has to learn that outings will be regular. Taking him out every hour or so to start with, gradually lengthening the gaps between trips, should do the trick. It’s not enough to open the door and send him out – he should be accompanied.

When he does go they need to show him that outside is indeed what they want. As soon as he finishes food should be dropped on the grass in front of him – showing him the grass is where he should go.

They shouldn’t bring him straight back in again when the job is done either. He likes being outside with them – so why punish him by coming straight back in after he’s performed?

Toilet training doesn’t happen by itself, unless we are very lucky and there is easy access to the outside. The older the dog the harder it gets because indoor toileting becomes learned behaviour.

They need a consistent routine whereby Teddy is very regularly taken out of the garden door, accompanied so he can be rewarded on the grass. Sometimes he actually does ask to go out at the door but they shouldn’t to rely upon it.

This is a case of what they get by way of success will depend upon just how much time and effort they put in, rain or shine. They just need to really work at it for a while.

NB. The exact protocols to best use for your own dog may be different to the approach I have planned for Teddy, which is why I don’t go into exact detail here of the strategies we will be using. Finding instructions on the internet that are not tailored to your own dog can do more harm than good. One size does not fit all. With this kind of issue, I suggest you find an experienced professional. If you live in my own area I would be very pleased to help (see my Get Help page).