Marking or Housetraining?

When the couple go out, they usually come back to small amounts of yellow pee in various parts of the kitchen.

marking in the house

Buddy – with Marley peeping in the background

Recently this had begun to happen at night too.

So they had gone back to ‘housetraining’ the little terrier with frequent visits to the garden. Adorable Buddy is now two years old.

The only thing that has so far made any difference has been putting him back in his crate at night where he used to sleep when he was younger.

Buddy crated – no urine.

The peeing never happens in the day if people are at home. However, if they go out and leave the two dogs alone for just a short while they come back to urine.  They will be videoing them to see exactly what happens during the day when they are out. Now that Buddy is in his crate during the night there is no urine – so we can be sure the marking is not Marley.

This is not actually a housetraining problem as it never happens when the dogs have access to their humans. The cause of the marking has to be Buddy’s feelings when left.

To compound the problem, it’s only recently that the dogs have been left alone, downstairs in the kitchen, at night time.

It’s not just peeing to empty his bladder. It’s marking.

The other dog, also two years old, is a beautiful Sprocker called Marley. Now left in the kitchen with Buddy at bedtime, he too is very stressed. He cries all night and scratches at the door. He wants to sleep upstairs on their bed like he used to.

The young lady has recently moved into her boyfriend’s house and they have decided that from now on the dogs will sleep downstairs. Previously they had slept on her bed with her – both where she lived previously and upstairs in this house. Now they are shut in the kitchen.

She has left Marley to cry for a couple of nights. This obviously is upsetting and tiring for her but imagine what state the sensitive Marley will be in after a whole night of crying.

Separation is the real problem. Marking is a symptom.

They may, understandably, be cross with Buddy when they come home which can only add to anxiety which is the cause of the whole problem. Because by definition ‘marking’ is about being noticed, in case he does see any connection with their crossness and the marking which is doubtful, they should ignore it and clear up when the dogs are both outside.

Because he has always marked when left alone there is also bound to be an element of habit to it which can now be broken.

Some days the dogs are left home alone in the kitchen for nine hours. Add to this their no longer being allowed in the bedroom for the night, it does mean a lot of time apart from the couple who adore the dogs and want them to be happy.

What can they do?

Buddy and Marley

They will need somehow to make sure the long days are broken up with someone coming in the middle of the day.

Some days the young man has been working from home. He says he will now take them to work in his office when he can. They have friends who may be able to help out on other days.

Left for shorter periods, they can perhaps keep alternating crating Buddy with leaving him free in the kitchen with Marley. When he’s in the crate he won’t pee. Both dogs can be left with a stuffed Kong to work on – something not wise if both are loose together just in case there are arguments over the food. (Take a look at this: Ode to a Kong).

They can also leave toys and other things for them to do. Background music especially created for dogs could help keep them calm.

They can gate the stairs so from now onwards both dogs no longer expect to go upstairs ever again. At present they can still be upstairs in the bedroom with the couple during the day and evening but have to go to the kitchen at night.

There are some other problems we are addressing. Sprocker Marley is constantly active, running about, leaping over things, sniffing and being busy and no doubt needs more to do. The little terrier is noisy, reactive and prone to obsessing over moving shadows and reflections. They have two kittens which over-excite Buddy. General strategies to lower their stress levels along with appropriate healthy stimulation will undoubtedly help with everything.

When people work hard with only so many hours in the day, something somewhere has to give. In this case with the young man is really on board with helping his girlfriend’s dogs and I am sure they will make the changes necessary to give them more healthy mental stimulation, less arousal and less time alone.

 

NB. For the sake of the story and for confidentiality also, this isn’t a complete ‘report’ with every detail, but I choose an angle with maybe a bit of poetic licence. The precise protocols to best use for your own dog may be different to the approach I have worked out for Buddy and Marley and I’ve not gone into exact precise details for that reason. Finding instructions on the internet or TV that are not tailored to your own dog can do more harm than good as the case needs to be assessed correctly. One size does not fit all so accurate assessment is important, particularly where fear is concerned. If you live in my own area I would be very pleased to help with strategies specific to your own dog (see my Help page)

Rescue Dog Not Home Trained

Rescue Rottweiler house-trained not home trained

Missy

Missy is house trained but I wouldn’t say she is home trained.

I had been in the house for just a few minutes when the large three-year-old Rottweiler jumped straight from the floor onto the dining table I was sitting at (to discourage her from jumping on me), probably smelling treats in my bag on the table out of her reach, knocking my cup of tea flying!

They also have another rescue dog, a calmer German Shepherd mix aged five called Duke.

The lady got in touch with me about a week ago – just before she brought Missy home. She was very worried that the two dogs might not get on although she had already taken Duke to the kennels to be with Missy seven times. I advised that the two dogs met up away from her house on neutral territory and then were walked back into the house together and all seems to be going well between them.

Moving into a house is a huge adjustment for Missy and the lady is determined that it’s going to be for keeps. The dog had been passed between several rescue kennels for most of her life before landing on her feet at last with a lovely home and someone who is prepared to do what it takes to give her the life she deserves. It’s hard to see why the gorgeous dog wasn’t adopted a long time ago. She is very friendly but just needs to learn house rules and adjust to home life.  Everyday things like a floor mop or getting into a car are unfamiliar and stressful for her. Considering what must be overwhelming changes in her life and routines she’s having to adjust to, she is managing surprisingly well.

They have had to put two gates in the kitchen doorway, one on top of the other, so that ‘high-jump’ Missy can be kept safe and the two dogs separated when necessary. She is perfectly happy to be left in there as I guess being behind bars is the norm to her. Rescues have obviously done some training with her within the environment of the kennels. She doesn’t pull on lead. She’s polite around food, she understands to sit and probably more besides.

Missy has redirected with some nipping onto Duke when suddenly over-aroused and she may do the same with people – mouthing and nibbling at them. They have learnt not to do certain things that excite her, like ball play. Life for her at the moment is quite exciting enough. There is a little bit of jealousy from Duke when Missy is fussed so the lady will need to make it clear that she chooses who she will fuss and when, not Duke. Missy is a little bit too playful for Duke at the moment. The lady needs to remain alert if their are valuable resources about like a bone or toy but there’s been no hint of any trouble so far.

The only way the two dogs can be walked is separately and Duke gets distressed when left alone, so they will be working on that. Though fine with larger dogs, Missy seems to be somewhat disturbed by little dogs – staring and what the lady describes as fixating on them, so there is work to be done there.

German Shepherd Staffie mix

Duke

One thing that needs to change as soon as possible is Missy’s persistent jumping up whether the person is standing or sitting. If they are sitting down she will leap on top of them – and she’s a big girl! She doesn’t know what it is acceptable to chew and what isn’t. It’s very much like having a huge puppy to train!

I visited them on just the fourth day in Missy’s new home, so we don’t yet know exactly what we are dealing with yet. When the dust has settled we will be able to work on training and play to help equip her for her new life and things that will focus her brain rather than stir her up. She will gradually become habituated to everyday things, I’m sure.

This purpose of this first visit has been to put things in place so that they start off right and pre-empt any obvious problems that could develop. There are lots of other things we can work on in the future when the time is right and depending upon how long the lady wants me to help her for.

NB. For the sake of the story and for confidentiality also, this isn’t a complete ‘report’ with every detail, but I choose an angle. The precise protocols to best use for your own dog may be different to the approach I have worked out for Missy and Duke. Finding instructions on the internet or TV that are not tailored to your own dog can do more harm than good, particularly where aggression may be involved. One size does not fit all. If you live in my own area I would be very pleased to help with strategies specific to your own dog (see my Get Help page).

Cocker Spaniel With a New Home

Show Cocker Lexie in her new homeLexie is eighteen months old. It seems that, although she was a show dog, she didn’t have a normal home life. Her new family of six picked her up about four weeks ago, and it became evident that apart from ring craft she hadn’t been for walks – with traffic, people and dogs, nor ever let off lead. She is wary of new people, men in particular, and is taking a while to get used to their four-year old son. She obviously hasn’t been house trained, and that is causing problems. It is all a big change for Lexie.

She is a very quiet dog and never barks (yet) – not when she hears things and is obviously looking scared, nor at people who come to the house. Being totally silent apart from the occasional whine is very unusual. My own Cocker Spaniel Pickle is quite vocal.

Like Cocker Spaniel Shadow who I visited just over a week ago, Lexie has quickly become very attached to the lady, not wanting to let her out of her sight. She took a little while to get used to the husband. She growled and snapped the air near the little boy when, beside the lady on the sofa, he leaned over her and patted her on the head.

I am very pleased that instead of trying to dominate the dog for growling, they reacted kindly and sensibly, by removing her. Copying or misinterpreting certain techniques seen on TV can have disastrous results. Lexie is already getting more at ease with the child, and with a little encouragement for him to give her space unless she comes to him, I am sure she will get used to him.

Although in many respects they have made quite a bit of headway since they fetched her, Lexie is however being rather spoilt by the females of the family! They probably feel this is the way to make her feel at home and loved. She jumps all over them where she doesn’t on the males who are much more matter-of-fact with her. Too much attention can be a burden on a dog, resulting in a needy dog. She is at a sensitive stage, so they need to back off a little.

I can help you, too, with these problems or any other that you may be having with your dog.