A very handsome German ShepherdMy photo doesn’t do justice to Caesar at all. He is a 16-month old GSD with a wonderful temperament. He is a good example of a dog that is well-trained, he knows and obeys many commands and hand signals, but when it comes to something¬† important like not jumping onto people, not pulling on lead and barking at horses (the rider could be thrown) he chooses to do his own thing! A typical teenager in fact.

The walk experience is not as relaxed and pleasant as it should be. Imagine a dog’s discomfort when pulling against a choke chain collar (‘choke’ being the operative word), being held on a tight lead and constantly corrected, when with a bit of work he could be walking beside his owner like there was no lead at all through his own choice. Advice from ex-police type trainers usually advocates the use of choke chains and dominance because those dogs are being trained for something that isn’t being simply a family pet and companion. I was in time to stop the owners buying a pinch (prong) collar – that was their next step in trying to stop their big dog pulling. These gadgets are about humans forcing their will upon the dog, not about the dog happily complying because he wants to. Do we really want to do this sort of thing to a wonderful, gentle natured dog – or to any dog in fact?

Walks don’t start outside the door. They start at home with general leadership skills so that the dog is calm and predisposed to cooperate. In a way it’s a lot more effort as gadgets can seem like a quick fix, but people I go to call me out because they love their dogs, and putting in some time and work is not an issue. They just need to be shown what to do. An owner may feel it’s OK being jumped on and obeying the dog’s demands in the house, but it’s not really good for the dog’s ‘upbringing’ if he’s to mature into a respectful, trustworthy adult that can be taken anywhere. Along with his being given the notion that he is the decision-maker come responsibilities of leadership – including leading the way when out on a walk.

By some simple modifications in the behaviour of the humans, the behaviour of the dog can change radically over a period of time.

The bottom line is, if we want the behaviour of our dog to change, then we need to change our own behaviour. ‘If you do what you’ve always done, you get what you’ve always gotten’ (anon).

I can help you, too, with these problems or any other that you may be having with your dog.