Rhodesian Ridgeback lies in her bedThe lady is looking after her daughter’s gorgeous young Rhodesian Ridgeback, Mara, while the daughter is settling the other side of the world. Mara will follow in a few month’s time.

She has looked after Mara on and off for the past year and she has been working very hard to give the dog the very best life possible whilst in her care, giving her plenty of exercise, the very best food and other behaviour/training help.

Sadly, the very well-socialised and friendly dog suddenly changed about three month’s ago. After her third season she had a false pregnancy. Almost immediately she changed. She become intolerant of certain other dogs. I wouldn’t call it aggression – more a matter of ‘attitude’. If the dog has a ball then that could be an issue. If they get close to another dog and there isn’t sufficient space she could react. She doesn’t like pushy dogs running up to her anymore. She may pin them down but she has never done any damage and their owners haven’t been concerned, but it’s a shock for the lady who now is on edge when meeting other dogs and wary of letting Mara off lead.

She has been given advice to keep Mara away from all dogs and on lead only for several months. I personally feel that as Mara is not significantly fearful or reactive to other dogs in general, this is too extreme. I fear that if she is away for too long from her usual interactions and play with her canine friends along with missing the social dog walks that she used to go on, it could create a far greater problem in the end.

Life for Mara is now very different in other ways too. Where before, when she lived with the daughter, they had a busy social life with people coming and going, noise and action, life now is quiet and peaceful. Against this calm backdrop sounds can be alarmingly out of proportion, encouraging her to be more territorial and protective.

Hormones could have a lot to answer for! Mara has now just been spayed so any hormonal aspect should be dying away, but the behaviour has been rehearsed and may remain or get worse if something isn’t done about it. Rather than avoiding dogs, the lady’s best approach is to have a lot more control over Mara. To make sure that at home she is relevant so Mara takes notice of her (she currently may ignore her), comes to her immediately when called and looks into her eyes when asked ‘watch me’. Established at home, these techniques can then be used outside.Ridgeback is sitting on her tail

I suggest meanwhile that the lady deliberately seeks out the safe old doggy friends so that Mara can continue to play, even if she’s on a long line so the lady has more confidence, and also that she goes back on the social walks, maybe only staying for a while if Mara shows any signs of stress. In confined places the lady can use her new attention-getting skills along with food and in open spaces Mara’s favourite thing – a ball.

With all the conflicting advice, it’s hard for someone to know what is best . Other instructions she has been given and that I don’t agree with is to totally ignore an already calm and polite dog when coming home or to rebuff a friendly dog that comes over and lovingly places her head on your lap or leans against you – labelling this as ‘dominant’. This to me is nonsense from the dinosaur days of old-fashioned dog training and the lady can relax and follow her instincts.

I am sure she will have preserved Mara’s lovely nature and regained her sociability for the time when, in a few months, she is ready to join her young owner the other side of the world.

NB. The precise protocols to best use for your own dog may be different to the approach I have worked out for Mara, which is why I don’t go into exact details here of our plan. Finding instructions on the internet or TV that are not tailored to your own dogs can do more harm than good. One size does not fit all. If you live in my own area I would be very pleased to help with strategies specific to your own dog (see my Get Help page).